Teacher Profile #1: Angela Molloy Murphy

My hopes lie in the transformative powers of education and the potential of our youngest citizens, to overcome great obstacles and manifest a radically just and equitable society for themselves and their children.

Hometown – Phoenix, Arizona. I left as soon as I could because the conservative atmosphere was stifling. I have been in Portland for 23 years.

Current Location – Rowanberry School, Portland, OR, USA

Degrees/Education – I have a Masters Degree in Education from PSU from before there was an Early Childhood specialization, but I took every ECE class they offered, so my advisor Christine Chaille told me I should say I have a MEd with an emphasis in ECE, for whatever it’s worth. I also went through their GTEP program and became licensed to teach K-8. This fall I started the Educational Leadership Doctorate, Curriculum & Instruction, EdD program at PSU and I can already tell it is going to be a totally transformational experience.

The program is intense. I am one who procrastinated all the way through my master’s program, never putting more than a few hours into even the most important papers I wrote, so this has been a shock. The jump from the Masters to the doctoral program is like the jump from kindergarten to high school…I just couldn’t have imagined it despite people trying to prepare me. The bad news…the first two years will be busy, stressful, intense. The good news, I learned more in a term than I have in the last many years put together because I need that structure to force me to work.

Age 46

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How long have you been working with children? Do you have your own children?

I have been working with young children for 24 years; for the last 20 years straight. I started teaching preschool and working as a nanny when I was a teenager, occasionally taking breaks to work at jobs that made more money. By my mid 20’s I had surrendered to the idea that working with young children was my calling, and I had to be creative and figure out a way to make a decent living at it. I have a 15 year old and a 10 year old of my own.

Tell us what your hopes for the future are. Where do you hope to be in ten years? Twenty?

I’m not sure what the future holds for me. I would like to eventually get more into teacher education but hope to always work with young children in some capacity.

What is on your plate for this school year?

Teaching, researching, presenting, etc. This year I am teaching alone for the first time ever and really loving it. I am a natural collaborator and love working with a partner, but as a reflective practitioner I started wondering if I might be using teaching in partnership to avoid stepping into my own power as a teacher and a director. It turns out, of course, that I was. So that’s something I’m exploring.

I am also enjoying the tiny class size that comes with teaching alone which has been a lovely surprise. I started the EdD program this fall so there is a lot that has come with that…new ideas, new conferences, new connections… it feels like my whole world has just blown up in a good way. I am planning on returning to Reggio Emilia, Italy in the Spring. I’m guessing that I’ll be ready to do more presenting next year…right now I’m just trying to catch my breath.

Non-educational practices/hobbies that are important to you.

Spending time with my family, reading and writing, photography, watching TV and movies, being outdoors, playing and listening to music, going to see live music. Just generally trying to pursue an artistic life. Also being gentle with myself when I just need to do something useless or do nothing at all.

Can you talk about a sacrifice or setback that you have tackled as an early childhood educator over the years?

It has been difficult for me to deal with the disrespect that people have for preschool, preschool teachers, and for young children in general. Even in the field of education, early education is undervalued. When I was young I think it hurt my ego. Now I have a better sense of my own self-worth, so I am offended for other reasons. I am disturbed by the mainstream view of young children as incompetent…as a “person in the making” rather than a whole person who has so much to offer to their community and to society. These days I try to take that feeling of indignation and pour it into elevating our culture’s image of the child beyond being simply consumers of products and technology.

Last book that you read that really inspired your thinking around your work?

Definitely Pedagogy of the Oppressed. I read it when I was very young, but revisiting it with more experience and maturity made it an entirely different read. Also, considering the potential for the incoming administration to use schools as a tool of oppression and subjugation, this book feels like a timely and urgent call to action. I think educators have been given a charge that we each have to respond to in our own way, or in multiple ways, to help education achieve its potential of emancipating people…raising them up. For me, my work with children all comes from and goes back to critical pedagogy.

Final thoughts: Hope, belief, love of the profession?

I guess my final thoughts are about hope. I campaigned hard for Bernie during this election season, and even though the election had a tragic outcome, the experience of working with wildly different people from all generations, unified by nothing but hope; it reconnected me to the ideals and activism of my youth in a profound way.  As they say in Rogue 1, “rebellions are built on hope.”  I think our work as educators of (and with) young children is also deeply rooted in hope…I also think it has the potential to function a lot like a rebellion, but that’s another story for another day! My hopes lie in the transformative powers of education and the potential of our youngest citizens, to overcome great obstacles and manifest a radically just and equitable society for themselves and their children.

 

 

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